ADDICTA: The Turkish Journal on Addictions
Original Articles

Problematic Social Media Use for Mood Modification: Its Associations with Shame, Guilt, Anger, and Difficulties in Emotion Regulation

1.

Department of Psychology, Yeditepe University, İstanbul, Turkey

2.

Department of Psychology, Medipol University, İstanbul, Turkey

3.

Department of Psychology, Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey

Addicta 2022; 9: 84-93
DOI: 10.5152/ADDICTA.2021.21009
Read: 242 Downloads: 74 Published: 01 April 2022

Problematic social media use is increasingly becoming one of the major concerns of both the research and clinic community. Social media can be used as a way of emotion regulation since it is a powerful tool for getting acceptance and support from others. However, how some negative emotions (i.e., shame, guilt, and anger) relate to problematic social media use has not been known yet. The aim of this study is to examine the mediator role of difficulties in emotion regulation and types of anger (anger-in and anger-out) on the relationship between shame and problematic social media use for mood modification. Similarly, the mediator role of difficulties in emotion regulation on the relationship between guilt and problematic social media use for mood modification was also investigated. A total of 393 university students completed the Shame and Guilt Scale, Trait Anger–Anger Expression Inventory, Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale, and Social Media Addiction Scale. Path analysis showed that problematic social media use for mood modification was predicted by shame through anger-in and difficulties in emotion regulation. In addition, difficulties in emotion regulation negatively mediated the relationship between guilt and problematic social media use for mood modification. The findings were also discussed.

Cite this article as: Nazlıgül, M. D., Koçyiğit, Ö., & Merdan Yıldız, E. D. (2022). Problematic social media use for mood modification: Its associations with shame, guilt, anger, and difficulties in emotion regulation. Addicta: The Turkish Journal on Addictions, 9(1), 84-93.

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ISSN 2148-7286 EISSN 2149-1305